Lizard fish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 HMS Maori

Malta, Malta island

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 35° 54.186' N
Longitude: 14° 30.942' E

User rating (1)


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 Access

How? From shore

Distance Instant access

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name Maori

Average depth 16 m / 52.5 ft

Max depth 25 m / 82 ft

Current None

Visibility Good ( 10 - 30 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Good

Experience All divers

Bio interest Poor

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Wreck

Dive site activities

- Dive training
- Photography

Dangers

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

English (Translate this text in English): On 12th February 1941 at 0200, while anchored at Malta, MAORI was attacked from the air and a bomb found its way into her Engine and Gear Room. The Tribal blew up and sank, still moored at the emergency destroyer buoy at the entrance to Dockyard Creek. Crews from other ships helped in the rescue work as blazing oil spread across the water. Since off-duty personnel customarily slept ashore in shelters while in Malta, only one man was killed in the attack. At daybreak, MAORI'S forepart still showed above the water and the wreck seriously interfered with shipping movements but it was decided to leave her there for the time being. Her 'A' and 'B' guns were still in good order so it was suggested that those guns be mounted on the Ricassoli Breakwater for the Army's use.
Bombs still fell on MAORI during succeeding air attacks. By the end of 1942, the Admiralty decided that her wreck should be lifted, moved out of Grand Harbour and set down off Sliema. On the 5th July 1945, MAORI'S hulk was scuttled finally in deep water far away from the harbour.

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HMS Maori
By chompy19
Oct 22, 2011
Scorpion on the Maori - With Jess (12) and Gary (Scubatech). Different route. Over top deck; big fish in the hold. Massive ugly scorpion fish in conning tower. Lots of fireworms - big ball of tangled worms - eating? Jess leaky mask - swapped with Gary.   Di
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HMS Maori
By chompy19
Oct 22, 2011
Seahorse in Valletta - Me, Jess & Gary (Scubatech). Light rain. GS entry at E2. Beautiful moray (gold, brown mottled). Red mullet. J+G saw saw 2x 4ft groupers. good clear view of the Maori - our first wreck. Gary found yellow seahorse in the seabed - wonderful. Strip
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Trip: Malta Oct 2011
By chompy19
From Oct 21, 2011 to Oct 26, 2011
Family trip to Malta, managed to squeeze in some dives with Jess. Dived with Gary from Scubatech.
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